Walkie Talkies – An Overview

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walkie talkie quanshengFor years people have been telling me that family, love and happiness are the crucial things in life…Today I realise that I can take or leave all that so long as We have this two way radio lyrics scars on 45 in the world.

Walkie talkies are unique in that the half-duplex channel they operate on will only allow one radio to transmit at any time, though there are no limits to the amount that can listen.
Rather than have an earpiece similar to a telephone, they have a built in speaker so the unit does not have to be held to the ear. They are used to connect to both other handheld units and to radio stations which are in a fixed location. The typical shape is of a large telephone handset, with a fixed antenna poking out of the top of the unit.

History
The fist radio audio transmitter and receiver that was coined the ‘Icom radio’ was created by Motorola. The group involved created the Motorola SCR-300 using frequency modulation. This first revision was actually backpack mounted. Not long afterward, during World War 2, Motorola produced the ‘Handie Talkie’ which rather confusingly is what we would now recognise as a ‘Walkie Talkie’.

It had massively reduced performance, but was the first completely self contained handheld device.
Nowadays
They are widely used nowadays in both consumer and commercial environments, for example outdoor recreations, business use, military and public safety. As a result of this the prices and quality of the units vary greatly, from kids walkie talkies to rugged digital units for heavy industry use.

As technology has improved, and reduce in size, so have the housings. Normally, you will find the commercial 2 Way Radios are tougher, in protective cases and limited to a select few frequencies. Consumer versions on the other hand tend to be smaller, more lightweight and capable of scanning across far more channels within the band.

Kids walkie talkies are generally low power units, and as a result are exempt from licence requirements. Though they often look the same as fully featured versions, they are normally relatively low-tech in comparison.

A digital 2 Way Radio has revolutionized on-site communications

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The basis of this post is to make you think about what in life is important and what does getting the new 2 way radio beckley wv really mean to us

The historic brewery where Guinness stout is produced. A day trip to Dublin gave Richard Lambley an opportunity to explore.

Occupying 63 acres of land on the south side of the Liffey, the St Jamess Gate Brewery, home of Guinness, has been a part of Dublins history for more than 250 years. Crammed into this site, not far from the city centre, are some 52 buildings ancient and
modern. Representing the gradual evolution of production methods as new facilities have been established over the years and older ones have fallen into disuse, they range from elegant eighteenth-century offices, laboratories and warehouse buildings to modern glass and
steel structures, including facilities such as modern experimental brewery. Theres even an underground reservoir. For the general public, the big attraction is the Guinness Storehouse, a visitor centre dedicated to the history and making of the famous
dark brew. Its seven storeys, modelled inside in the shape of a giant pint glass, are topped by a gallery offering spectacular views across the brewery site and the city itself. In the working part of the brewery, on-site
communications are provided by a Kenwood Nexedge digital PMR system. This equipment, replacing an earlier analogue installation, is the work of the Dublin-based PMR A digital PMR system has revolutionized on-site communications at Irelands
most celebrated industrial location the historic brewery where Guinness stout is produced. A day trip to Dublin gave Richard Lambley an opportunity to explore Dark secrets supplier BP Multipage whose customer,
both at the brewery and at other Irish sites operated by Guinnesss owner, the drinks giant Diageo, is the security company G4S. We look after their interests in relation to PMR, explains Philip Pratt, of BP Multipage.
Theyve come up with a number of different projects that weve worked with them on, and we also look after their own equipment. They have a mixture of various different manufacturers equipment. In the main it would be
Kenwood, because we are the distributors here in Ireland for Kenwood. But we also import Motorola products.

On the Guinness brewery site, the Nexedge system supports some 55 radios, from a mobile installed in the private ambulance to the handportables carried by security staff and maintenance workers. These are managed
from a central control room at the brewery, where we meet Darragh McNicholas, contract services manager for G4S. Darragh points to a map on the wall which shows the complexity of the crowded site, hinting of fearsome radio
coverage problems. The site is sliced through by a busy main road, with tunnels beneath to link the two parts. At the moment youre standing here, Darragh says, indicating the spot with a finger.
Theres a fire station up here and you came in at this gate over here. We have a whole other Product comes in up here and its roasted, fired down a pipe by compressed air to the brewhouse which is just over here, he continues,
his finger tracing paths across the map. Then it goes from the brewhouse, here, underground to the fermentation plant down here. And thats our kegging line here. And we also have a tank station over here, because the Guinness extract is
exported all over the world for canning. On the control desk, twin screens display the status of The walkie talkies connected to the Nexedge system (this would include any alarms or mandown alerts), and a bank of CCTV monitors
behind presents an overall view of activity across the site. Four talkgroups are currently in use on the radio system.

Kenwoods dispatcher software also allows text messages to be typed at the keyboard and although this facility is not yet in use, Darragh foresees a future for it as a quick method of exchanging updates without tying
up the radio channel. In addition, the software records a complete activity history, showing who has called whom, with time and date stamps. If there is an emergency, a red warning will flash on the
screen, indicating the number of the person who is in trouble. The microphone on the calling 2 Way Radio will then go live. G4S has worked as a contractor at the brewery for more than two years, but Darragh
received a compelling reminder of the critical importance of communications when a fire at the lager plant damaged the old radio system. When that happened, power was shut off, Tracks still lying in the roadways are a relic of the narrow-gauge goods railway which
once served the 63-acre site. A tunnel, still in use, led them under the street outside he recalls. It went in the flaking plant as well, and the system didnt survive it, as such. We ended up with very, very poor radio communication,
and we were very badly exposed on site from applications point of view. Coverage around site had been difficult anyway. A lot of the buildings are metal and theres liquid, which radio signals dont like.
What, then, was the reason for switching to digital? Darragh says the requirement was simply for a good system. We had a good look around to see what was out there and what was the best fit for us, he explains.
And we were willing to spend the money on it. But there was all the additional stuff that it would give us the lone worker, the man-down system as well. And there was stuff down along the line that we may be able to
tap into, such as PABX [interconnect] and that sort of thing.

Furthermore, he adds, what works in Dublin could also be repeated at other G4S sites in Ireland, and within other Diageo plants too. The systems could even be interconnected, if required. But even on its own, the digital radio system
at Guinness, with its improved coverage of the site, has been a revolutionary improvement, in Darraghs opinion. Its savage, its by a busy main road, with tunnels beneath to link the two parts.
At the moment youre standing here, Darragh says, indicating the spot with a finger. Theres a fire station up here and you came in at this gate over here. We have a whole other site on the other side of the road.
Product comes in up here and its roasted, fired down a pipe by compressed air to the brewhouse which is just over here, he continues, his finger tracing paths across the map. Then it goes from the brewhouse, here, underground
to the fermentation plant down here. And thats our kegging line here. And we also have a tank station over here, because the Guinness extract is exported all over the world for canning. On the control desk, twin screens display
the status of radios connected to the Nexedge system (this would include any alarms or mandown alerts), and a bank of CCTV monitors behind presents an overall view of activity across the site. Four talkgroups are currently
in use on the two Way Radio system. Kenwoods dispatcher software also allows text messages to be typed at the keyboard and although this facility is not yet in use, Darragh foresees a future for it as a quick
method of exchanging updates without tying up the radio channel.

In addition, the software records a complete activity history, showing who has called whom, with time and date stamps. If there is an emergency, a red warning will flash on the screen, indicating the number of the person
who is in trouble. The microphone on the calling radio will then go live. G4S has worked as a contractor at the brewery for more than two years, but Darragh received a compelling reminder of the critical
importance of communications when a fire at the lager plant damaged the old radio system. When that happened, power was shut off, Tracks still lying in the roadways are a relic of the narrow-gauge goods railway which
once served the 63-acre site. A tunnel, still in use, led them under the street outside he recalls. It went in the flaking plant as well, and the system didnt survive it, as such. We ended up with very, very poor radio communication,
and we were very badly exposed on site from applications point of view. Coverage around site had been difficult anyway. A lot of the buildings are metal and theres liquid, which radio signals dont like.
What, then, was the reason for switching to digital? Darragh says the requirement was simply for a good system. We had a good look around to see what was out there and And we were willing to spend the money
on it. But there was all the additional stuff that it would give us the lone worker, the man-down system as well. And there was stuff down along the line that we may be able to tap into, such as PABX [interconnect] and
that sort of thing.

Furthermore, he adds, what works in Dublin could also be repeated at other G4S sites in Ireland, and within other Diageo plants too. The systems could even be interconnected, if required. But even on its own, the digital radio system
at Guinness, with its improved coverage of the site, has been a revolutionary improvement, in Darraghs opinion. Its savage, its

by a busy main road, with tunnels beneath to link the two parts. At the moment youre standing here, Darragh says, indicating the spot with a finger. Theres a fire station up here and you came in
at this gate over here. We have a whole other site on the other side of the road. Product comes in up here and its roasted, fired down a pipe by compressed air to the brewhouse which is just over here, he continues,
his finger tracing paths across the map. Then it goes from the brewhouse, here, underground to the fermentation plant down here. And thats our kegging line here. And we also have a tank station over here, because the Guinness extract is
exported all over the world for canning. On the control desk, twin screens display the status of radios connected to the Nexedge system (this would include any alarms or mandown alerts), and a bank of CCTV monitors
behind presents an overall view of activity across the site. Four talkgroups are currently in use on the radio system. Kenwoods dispatcher software also allows text messages to be typed at the keyboard
and although this facility is not yet in use, Darragh foresees a future for it as a quick method of exchanging updates without tying up the radio channel. In addition, the software records a complete
activity history, showing who has called whom, with time and date stamps. If there is an emergency, a red warning will flash on the screen, indicating the number of the person who is in trouble. The microphone on the
calling Icom radio will then go live. G4S has worked as a contractor at the brewery for more than two years, but Darragh received a compelling reminder of the critical importance of communications when a fire at
the lager plant damaged the old radio system. When that happened, power was shut off, Tracks still lying in the roadways are a relic of the narrow-gauge goods railway which once served the 63-acre site. A tunnel, still in use, led them under the street outside
he recalls. It went in the flaking plant as well, and the system didnt survive it, as such. We ended up with very, very poor radio communication, and we were very badly exposed on site from applications point of view.
Coverage around site had been difficult anyway. A lot of the buildings are metal and theres liquid, which radio signals dont like. What, then, was the reason for switching to digital? Darragh says the requirement was
simply for a good system. We had a good look around to see what was out there and what was the best fit for us, he explains. And we were willing to spend the money on it. But there was all the additional stuff
that it would give us the lone worker, the man-down system as well. And there was stuff down along the line that we may be able to tap into, such as PABX [interconnect] and that sort of thing.
Furthermore, he adds, what works in Dublin could also be repeated at other G4S sites in Ireland, and within other Diageo plants too. The systems could even be interconnected, if required.

But even on its own, the digital radio system at Guinness, with its improved coverage of the site, has been a revolutionary improvement, in Darraghs opinion. Its savage, its by a busy main road, with tunnels beneath to
link the two parts. At the moment youre standing here, Darragh says, indicating the spot with a finger. Theres a fire station up here and you came in at this gate over here. We have a whole other
site on the other side of the road. Product comes in up here and its roasted, fired down a pipe by compressed air to the brewhouse which is just over here, he continues, his finger tracing paths across the map. Then
it goes from the brewhouse, here, underground to the fermentation plant down here. And thats our kegging line here. And we also have a tank station over here, because the Guinness extract is
exported all over the world for canning. On the control desk, twin screens display the status of radios connected to the Nexedge system (this would include any alarms or mandown alerts), and a bank of CCTV monitors
behind presents an overall view of activity across the site. Four talkgroups are currently in use on the radio system. Kenwoods dispatcher software also allows text messages to be typed at the keyboard
and although this facility is not yet in use, Darragh foresees a future for it as a quick method of exchanging updates without tying up the radio channel.

In addition, the software records a complete activity history, showing who has called whom, with time and date stamps. If there is an emergency, a red warning will flash on the screen, indicating the number of the person
who is in trouble. The microphone on the calling radio will then go live. G4S has worked as a contractor at the brewery for more than two years, but Darragh received a compelling reminder of the critical
importance of communications when a fire at the lager plant damaged the old radio system. When that happened, power was shut off, Tracks still lying in the roadways are a relic of the narrow-gauge goods railway which
once served the 63-acre site. A tunnel, still in use, led them under the street outside he recalls. It went in the flaking plant as well, and the system didnt survive it, as such. We ended up with very, very poor radio communication,
and we were very badly exposed on site from applications point of view. Coverage around site had been difficult anyway. A lot of the buildings are metal and theres liquid, which radio signals dont like.
What, then, was the reason for switching to digital? Darragh says the requirement was simply for a good system. We had a good look around to see what was out there and what was the best fit for us, he explains.
And we were willing to spend the money on it. But there was all the additional stuff that it would give us the lone worker, the man-down system as well. And there was stuff down along the line that we may be able to
tap into, such as PABX [interconnect] and that sort of thing.

Furthermore, he adds, what works in Dublin could also be repeated at other G4S sites in Ireland, and within other Diageo plants too. The systems could even be interconnected, if required. But even on its own, the digital radio system
at Guinness, with its improved coverage of the site, has been a revolutionary improvement, in Darraghs opinion. Its savage, its