New, IC-A15 Ground Crew Aviation Two Way Radio From Icom

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communication devices incI don’t know if you came here as you read it on social media, twitter, facebook, google +, stumble upon or somewhere else. But thank you for coming and I trust you like reading this as much as I did.

The IC-A15 from Icom, is a new air band transceiver designed to be used by ground crew working in airports and airfields. The IC-A15 is compact, lightweight and has a high capacity Lithium-Ion battery pack (2000mAh) so it can be used all day. It has great audio output to cut through environmental noise. And its built really, really rugged…and rain-resistant too…enough for the rigours of the aviation market. Just check out some of the interesting features of this new radio: Get your Communications heard.
5 watts of transmit power are built-in, enough to cover the largest of airports and get signals through and around thick walls and metal hangars. In addition 700mW of crisp, clear audio is provided by the built-in BTL amplifier which should make sure communications get heard. Easy to use, even for high turnover environments.

The IC-A15 Ground to Air Two Way Handheld Radio is really easy to operate and ideal for large companies where the Walkie Talkie may be used by shift workers. The full-featured keypad allows direct input of channels and frequencies. 200 Memory channels and 8 alphanumeric LCD characters per channel allow you to allocate specific users a channel on the radio. A low battery indication and beep alert are also standard features. Long lasting battery life, more than enough for shift work

The IC-A15 comes with a large Lithium-Ion battery pack (2000mAh) that can provide up to 18 hours of operation. Being Li-ion, it has superior weight-performance ratio. Compact, Rugged, lightweight

More power is housed in a smaller, lighter package. Carrying the lightweight IC-A15 on the belt will be less of a hassle for ground workers. The IC-A15 also meets strict military specifications (MIL STD MIL-810C/D/E/F) for ruggedness. The water resistant construction, equivalent to IPX4, provides reliable operation in wet conditions. Various charging options

The BC-179 desktop charger securely holds and charges the battery, even in bumpy conditions. The charger may be powered by an optional cigarette lighter cable, CP-22. An AA backup battery case, BP-261, is also available. The list price of the IC-A15 is 200.00 ex.VAT and is available from authorised Icom dealers. Ian Lockyer, Marketing Manager of Icom UK Ltd said, The simple to use IC-A15 is an ideal work horse ground to air radio for airports and airfields. The no-nonsense design will make it an important communication choice for airport operators. A high resolution picture of this product can be downloaded from our image bank

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2 Way Radios for Lone Workers

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So i discovered this post on the internet and i understand that just posting it as the whole article is not the right thing, I got consent from the original writer and read up how to curate articles, so this is it…….i thought this was interesting because it highlights some of the highs and lows that I encountered when i was working within the industry.

Every employer has a duty of care under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, to ensure so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of all its employees in the workplace and equally that persons not in their employment are not exposed to risks to their health and safety so far as is reasonably practicable with the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act introduced in 2007, the implications for enterprises in the public and private sectors of not taking lone worker protection seriously have escalated.

Two-way radios are already widely in use in lone worker applications across chemical and manufacturing plants, utilities, mining, security and transport industries where personnel often cover large, remote areas or operate in hazardous environments.

However, with the increase in flexible working times, care in the community services, home deliveries and reductions in workforces operating from fixed locations, more people than ever are now operating as lone workers, often in situations where they may be exposed to potential accidents and inappropriate or violent behaviour.

While the reliability and quality of any Kenwood Earpiece would prove to be an asset in most lone worker scenarios, the NEXEDGE range of digital two-way hand portable walkie talkies and mobile in-vehicle two-way radio units offer much more than the ability to transmit voice and data instantly and efficiently.

All models feature Emergency Key and Emergency Call features as standard, while some advanced models additionally offer Lone Worker and an Emergency Advanced Motion Detection Function, which make them ideal for incorporating within a robust health and safety and lone worker policy.

NEXEDGE Digital Two-way Radios with Lone Worker features include both hand-portable walkie talkies and mobile in-vehicle units.

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Which Major Discoveries led to the Invention of the 2 way radio

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2 way radio kmartYou’ve probably stumbled upon this looking for information about communication device ppt’s, hopefully this will help you answer some of those questions, if not please click on one of the relevant links within the article

The modern two-way radio, which is a direct descendent of the WW2-era Motorola two way radio, first became recognizable in the years just before the outbreak of World War 2. Its origins are an interesting story in their own right (but I’ll condense it here).

Three names are usually mentioned with regards to the invention of the walkie-talkie…

The first is Canadian inventor Donald Hings (1907 – 2004), who invented an early version of the technology back in 1937 (although it wasn’t widely acknowledged or used). Then, there’s American inventor Al Gross (1918 – 2000), who patented the name ‘walkie-talkie’ for his own invention a year later in ’38. Because of the ubiquity of the name, Gross became the best known ‘inventor’ of the technology at the time, even though it had technically existed for 12 months beforehand. However, this isn’t to detract from Gross’ claim, because his version of the walkie-talkie was actually quite different from Hings’ (despite operating on the same essential principles).

Then, there’s Dan Noble (1901 – 1980), a Motorola employee who, although he definitely did not invent the technology, certainly did lead the team that created the widely used WW2-era walkie-talkies. Hings’ version of the technology wasn’t used by the military until 1942, which led to Dan Noble being credited with the invention.

So, make of that mess what you will…

Now, to go back further (and get to the meat of your question), here is a list of discoveries that led to the creation of the two-way radio.

James Clark Maxwell (1831-1879), a mathematical physicist (and one of a seemingly endless line of genius Scotsmen) demonstrated that electromagnetic waves could propagate in free space in his 1865 paper ‘A Dynamical Theory of the Electromagnetic Field’ (of which the most famous fan was Albert Einstein). This led German physicist Heinrich Hertz (1857 – 1894) to build on Maxwell’s pioneering work by conclusively proving the existence of electromagnetic waves in 1887.

After that, Serbian-American inventor, physicist, vegetarian and absolute genius Nikola Tesla (1856 – 1943) demonstrated the transmission of radio frequency energy in 1892. After that, Italian inventor Guglielmo Marconi (1874 – 1937) built a wireless system capable of transmitting signals over unprecedented distances in 1895 – which is pretty much the birth of radio.

This was an important area of study at the time; the first wireless telephone conversation took place in 1880 and was made by Alexander Graham Bell (1847 – 1922), who was another Scot, incidentally. A lot of people were working on similar technology, so it would not have been unlike the ‘space race’ of the 50’s and 60’s at the time.

Marconi went about taking over pretty much all business related to the invention of the Walkie Talkie (which was, eventually, credited solely to him) and, by 1907, he had established the first commercial transatlantic radio service (and also pretty much screwed Tesla out of any/all royalties he would have been owed. Nice).

Thanks to the work of Julio Cervera Baviera (1854 – 1929) the Spanish army became the first to use radio for military purposes (at least, as far as I’m aware, anyway) in the early 1900’s.

Canadian inventor Reginald Fessenden (1866 – 1932) (who also helped to develop sonar and TV, incidentally), invented AM radio (no, not the ‘Breakfast Show’ –it means that more than one station can broadcast signals) when, on Christmas Eve 1906, he played some violin and read from the Bible.

Eventually, all ships were equipped with radio transmission capability, with Marconi owning a total monopoly over ship-to-shore communication. Ship-to-shore contact became a subject of increased awareness and importance following the Titanic disaster of 1912 and radios began to be seen even more as a crucial safety measure in all areas of industry as a result. Look up the 1913 ‘International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea’ (it has a Wikipedia page, I just checked) for more info.

Skipping forward a bit, now. Throughout the 1930’s, there were a ton of minor (and major) improvements made to the technology, more than a few made by Marconi and his engineers. Some really clever people made their mark on the fledgling technology here, but if I mention them all, we’ll never get to the end.

Oh, by the way, FM radio was subsequently invented by American electrical engineer Edwin Armstrong (1890 – 1954) in 1933.

By the late 30’s, Hings comes into the picture, as does the rising spectre of a terrifyingly advanced Nazi Germany. The race was on to have the best equipped armies out there fighting the Axis powers and the allies wisely put a huge amount of manpower into the development of portable radio communication. It was a decision which led directly to the rapid co-opting of Hings and Gross’ work, as well as the later improvements made by Noble.

This is a long and fascinating story (about which many books have been written), but, as a ‘potted history’ of sorts, I hope that answers your question.