IMPROVING COMMUNICATION AT A HISTORIC five-STAR HOTEL

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Thanks for reading my site, heres an article i actually loved reading. With their authorization i can repost it. I write plenty of my own articles, but irregularly repost other content i find remarkable, thankyou for reading.

zartek two way radio pricesLocated in the heart of London, the world-renowned Claridges Hotel is famous for its five-star service and premier clientele that includes celebrities, dignitar-ies and the business elite. Named Top UK Business Hotel 2009 and Best UK Hotel for Rooms 2010 by Cond Nast Traveler, providing flawless service is paramount to this historic luxury property.

Guests expect extraordinary attentiveness, responsive security and absolute discretion from Claridges staff. The challenge facing the hotel was how could it achieve instant, reliable and seamless communication and make it virtually invisible to guests?

The Challenge

INSTANT, DISCREET AND RELIABLE COMMUNICATION, AROUND THE CLOCK

Claridges unique Art Deco architecture presented a unique set of challenges. Our building is over 100 years old, explains Tony Matthews, Security Manager. Its constructed of concrete, steel in

between, and we had a lot of problems getting Walkie Talkie signals through.

With walls up to a meter thick, alternative technologies in the hotel such as phones and Wi-Fi can suffer from blackspots and poor reception leading to missed calls. Some areas, such as the kitchen

and basement, had no coverage at all. Given the high-profile clientele and security needs of guests, communication throughout the property had to be reliable and uninterrupted. If someone needed assistance or an incident occurred, response had to be immediate.

DISCREET COMMUNICATION, FROM STREET TO SUITE

Communication devices for a hotel this sophisticated had to be sleek, discreet and stylish, too. From the street to the penthouse suite, Claridges sought a communication tool where function met style. It had to fulfill coverage and reliability requirements and

fit neatly under their tailored, executive uniforms. The ideal device must be slim, light and easy to use, without bulkiness or obtrusiveness.

According to Russell Penton, Health and Security Officer, The radio needs to be small so that its not obvious to any of our guests that Im wearing it. And because we do such long shifts 12 hours plus the more comfortable and lightweight the radio is, its a benefit to us as an end user, definitely.

MOTOTRBO DIGITAL

TWO-WAY RADIOS DELIVER IT ALL

When Cliff Davies, Director of Sales and Marketing at Audiolink Ltd., an authorized Motorola distributor, learned about Claridges desire to improve communications, he recommended the MOTOTRBO system of two-way digital radios, repeaters, accessories, applications and services.

MOTOTRBO delivered all the benefits of digital, including instant, uninterrupted communication; increased capacity for talk groups in the hotel; excellent coverage, even in drop-out areas; integrated data applications designed for hospitality; and extended battery performance for long work shifts.

Claridges Hotel Operations Manager Michael Bonsor underscores how important MOTOTRBO is to hotel operations. A communications tool has to be quick, easy to use, and reliable, he says. When there is an emergency in the hotel, when there is a fire alarm or security incident, we need to be able to rely on a

communication tool. Sometimes the phones dont work or we dont have mobile phone reception, but the radios always work.

The SL Series radios are the biggest step forward that Ive seen as a radio user. Theyre much more advanced in how light they are, very user friendly and the menus and the displays

are very easy to use.

Russell Penton

Health and Security Officer, Claridges

SL SERIES: DISCREET WAS NEVER THIS SLEEK

Understanding how important image and discretion are, Audiolink Ltd. suggested the MOTOTRBO SL Series digital two Way Radios to Claridges. Not only did they have an incredibly sleek shape and slim size that fit the staffs executive attire, the SL Series portables are so light, they are less than half the weight of a standard radio, yet so robust and reliable, they stand up to the longest shifts and most demanding tasks.

Effortless to carry, elegant in styling and easy to use, with Bluetooth wireless and compact single-wire accessories that are covert and comfortable to wear, the SL Series has enhanced discreet communication and increased guest satisfaction at the famed London hotel.

When a guest steps out of a cab, the doorman can quickly and discreetly communicate the name of the guest to reception, so by the time that person is ready to check in, reception is already prepared with the guests name. The extra minutes the radios provide help make the difference in the guest experience.

IMPROVES THE WAY STAFF INTERACT

From the front desk to the back office, Claridges personnel are enthusiastic about the compactness, covertness and convenience of the SL Series.

When we communicate with the luggage porters, often guests are standing in front of us. Its difficult to do in a subtle way, but the SL Series really helps, because its very small and its very convenient. It almost goes unnoticed, says receptionist Ruby Mountain. We wear them on our uniform so its nice to have it light and it makes the uniform look smart because you cant see the radio.

Our definitive goal is to settle in a guest as swiftly and as comfortably as possible. We

communicate with many different departments to make one simple step happen. The SL Series radio is one of the tools which helps us do it.

Michael Bonsor

Hotel Operations Manager, Claridges

About Audiolink Ltd.

A radio communications company based in London, Audiolink Ltd. has enjoyed a historic 35-year partnership with Motorola, providing comprehensive solutions in two-way technology, from the latest products and services to on-site support.

SPEEDS UP SECURITY AND RESPONSE TIME

In the middle of an incident, my officers need to be able to contact each other instantly, and using the MOTOTRBO SL Series we do that fantastically well, says Security Manager Tony Matthews. If they have to escort someone out, they need to be discreet. The

cables need to be very comfortable so we can hide them behind our suits and be comfortable for the staff to wear.

Describing how critical the radios speed and efficiency are for communicating between all departments, fellow officer Penton says, Theres no dialing of any numbers. Its push, click and talk, and youre assured that youre going to speak to who you need to speak to on the other end of the line.

ENHANCES THE GUEST EXPERIENCE

With its sleek shape, uninterrupted coverage, crystal-clear audio, enhanced features and integrated data applications, the MOTOTRBO SL Series is ensuring Claridges maintains its legacy of flawless service

Colombia probes reported military spying of peace negotiators

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Whilst many of my visitors will be interested by some of my own articles, here is one i found surfing around blog.com that is much better written than I could ever hope to achieve. Maybe at some point I’ll get to this level, you never know.

Colombian military intelligence operatives intercepted phone communications of the government’s negotiating team at peace talks with Marxist FARC rebels, a newsweekly said on Tuesday, prompting the interior ministry to announce a probe of the reported espionage.

Interior Minister Aurelio Iragorri said the government appeared to be the victim of the surveillance. President Juan Manuel Santos and his Cabinet ministers had never ordered the interception of phone communications, Iragorri told Caracol walkie talkie.

Colombia began peace talks in Cuba with the FARC, or Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, in November 2012, weeks after Santos announced he had been holding secret talks with rebel leaders.
The negotiations have surfaced as a campaign issue ahead of elections in May in which Santos is running for reelection.
Semana weekly magazine said the cellular phones of peace negotiators Humberto de la Calle, Sergio Jaramillo and Alejandro Eder were intercepted, as well as leftist politicians like former Senator Piedad Cordoba.

Data from text messages were collected, but telephone calls were not listened to, it reported. The espionage was conducted from a Bogota restaurant and adjoining Internet center set up as front for the operation.
The government peace talks with the FARC guerrillas are conducted in secrecy, which both sides have held to, except for brief communiqu豠about their progress.

This is the first spy scandal to emerge since the government intelligence agency known as the DAS was shut down after revelations of wire-tapping during the government of former President Alvaro Uribe.
The government and FARC have fought for five decades.
The peace talks, while mostly popular, have some detractors, like Uribe and his party’s choice as candidate for president in May, Oscar Ivan Zuluaga.

The aim of the military intelligence operation, code named “Andromeda,” was to garner as much information as possible about what was being discussed at the peace talks in Havana, according to a source cited by Semana.
Commenting on the Semana report, Interior Minister Iragorri said, “The most important is to carry out an internal investigation because this government at no time, no minister or the president, have given any instructions to interfere with communications of anyone.”

“In this case we are more the victims than the victimizer,” he added.
Semana said it spent 15 months investigating the spying and spoke to as many as 25 sources before publishing.
For a link to the Semana story, please see URL:
here (Editing by W Simon)

BC Link — Snowsports Walkie Talkie

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So ladies and gentlemen, i have one more outstanding walkie talkie icon article for you to read, i know, you do not have to thank me each and every one, just add a social like to the piece to show your appreciation.

I’ve now got about 10 days using the BC Link radio. Durability so far so good. Battery life is terrific, I did one test that involved leaving the radio switched on for the bulk of 4 days, with moderate use each day. Battery was still going strong at the end of that period. Only gripe is I’d like the radio base unit to indicate when it’s getting a charge, because when you charge from USB other than the provided wall-charger you have no way of knowing if the radio is getting juice. Thus, if you’ve got a defective USB cable or connection (not uncommon) you could merrily be charging along only to find out the next morning you’ve still got a dead battery. At any rate, charge every night and you never need worry about using the radio heavily all day long. (But for battery life insurance, still use good radio technique such as speaking clearly and concisely instead of rambling or fooling around, as well as turning the unit off when not in use.)
This thing is cool. From the plain black-on-black styling to the waterproof connectors, the new BC Link 2-way radio from Backcountry Access reeks of quality and downright functionality. I got one of the first retail units, figured this first-look was appropriate. Field testing commences immediately (see below for some results from later today).
The grand unboxing of BC link. I have a feeling a few of these will be opened Christmas morning.
Grand unboxing of BC link. The sound of heavenly radio transmissions came down from on high as we lifted the lid. I have a feeling a few of these will be opened Christmas morning.
The concept is bold. Instead of trying to match the bloviated “blister pack” FRS/GMRS Radio market with a Battlestar Gallactica electronics toy lookalike, BCA came up with an understated black moisture sealed radio that only works with the attached speaker-mic on a dedicated coil cable. Idea is you carry the base unit in your backpack or perhaps a jacket pocket (also has a belt clip if you want to totally geek out). Controls for normal use are on the mic, while you set your background settings (channels, beeps-on-off, etc.) on the base unit.
I’m about as familiar with FRS/GMRS walkie-talkies as you can get (as well as licensed Amateur radio operator KC0FNM). Thus, only surprise here is that without a PTT (push to talk) switch on the base unit, I expected it to be smaller. But the base unit has to carry a fair sized lithium rechargeable battery, which probably drives the form factor.
Link base unit is designed to run inside your backpack, with external handmic providing enough control for normal use.
Link’s base unit is designed to run inside your backpack, with external handmic providing enough control for normal use.
Link handmic (otherwise known as a speaker mic) has necessary controls. Small dial at top right
Link handmic (otherwise known as a speaker mic/microphone) has necessary controls. Small dial at top right is on-off and volume. Lower dial with letters is the channel pre-sets. A series of LEDs at top left indicate the radio being powered up, transmitting, etc.
Speaking of the battery, per current pop electronics you can only charge the BCA Link via USB. This requires the usual USB wall-wart adapter if you want to juice from residential wiring. You can presumably plug directly into your computer, or into whatever source you’re using to feed USB current to say, your smartphone. Mixed emotions about this. In an ideal world, USB would simplify things. But shucks, with a dozen or more different types of USB connectors out there (was this designed by Microsoft?), I still carry a spaghetti mess of cables and adapters, so really, things are just as complicated as in the old days. What is more, I still feel the ideal DC current standardization is the >< 12 volts of automobiles. But that's another story.
Of more importance, you'd better have a good charging strategy for BC Link if you're on a multi-day backcountry skiing trip without electricity. I'll do the official WildSnow begging to BCA for an AA battery pack, but something tells me this won't be forthcoming any time soon. Instead, look to any of the aftermarket auxiliary USB chargers, such as those by Anker and Goal Zero.
Settings
If you’re familiar with Motorola FRS/GMRS 2 Way Radio, changing channels and such on the Link base unit will be easy. It’s done exactly the same way. Ditto for disabling all the annoying beeps and noises these types of walkie-talkies seem to think would make our lives better. The all important LOCK mode is obvious; designated by a graphic on the base unit face: push MENU and OK buttons simultaneously and you get a nice countdown to when the unit is locked. The only thing non-standard is setting the channel memories that correspond to 6 settings on the handmic, switched using a small dial marked with letters A through F. This is too easy. Just get the base unit set to the channel you want, then press the OK button. There you go, you have a pre-set for whatever letter you had the handmic dial set on. (Link comes with pre-sets that will probably become standards, but I’d recommend figuring out a few pre-sets specific to your usual group of backcountry skiers to prevent channel crowding once these radios are in common use.)
Note: There are no FRS/GMRS channels “officaily” designated for various uses, but convention designates channel 1 for general public chat, and channel 20 (with quiet code 22) for emergencies. That said, in most areas the FRS/GMRS channels are NOT monitored in any way that would help you call for help. In reality, channel 1 tends to be overused due to it being the easiest channel to get to on a new radio, as well as being easy to remember. Thus, when setting your radio we recommend not using channel 1. But perhaps keep channel 20 as a setting and don’t use it for day-to-day comm.
Likewise, bear in mind that the FCC requires these types of walkie talkies to lowest power on channels 8 through 14. Thus, when picking channels for general backcountry use it’s advisable to pick a channel from 2-7 or 15-22 (Link transmits at one watt on those channels, 1/2 watt on the other ones). Furthermore, the antenna on this type of radio can be assumed to be tuned to the midrange of frequencies (channels), with performance falling off at either end of the channels. Thus, for a bit of extra umph in your distance range I’d recommend using channels 6,7,15,16,17.
Conversely, if you want to conserve battery and know you’ll always be close to your compadres, try using the Link’s lower power (1/2 watt) channels 8-14. These will perform better than you might think. The Link radio doesn’t have a low/high power setting, so using these channels will significantly extend your battery life if you’re doing much talking. In other words, this is a way of forcing the radio to lower power.
IMPORTANT: To get best performance from any 2-way radio, all users must have their antennas oriented in the same position. Convention for this is to orient your antenna vertically. Since the Link base unit is presumably buried in your backpack, it may end up in a random position (BCA packs will have a radio mount, presumably vertical). I’d recommend all party members figure out a way to carry/mount their radios to the antenna stays somewhat vertical. By the same token, the higher the radio is above the ground the better it will perform.
Water resistance
We’re assuming the Link is robust and “waterproof.” Word from BCA is it conforms to standard IP56. In my research this indicates the unit is sealed against powerful gushing water, but is not immersion proof. From what I see when physically examining the Link, my take is it’ll hold up fine to normal humidity and moisture encountered in backcountry skiing, but might not be the radio for commercial fishing. That said, BCA told me they actually tested the radio at full immersion and it passed. All connections have obvious seals. Both the hand mic and base unit cases are assembled with small, confidence inspiring metal fasteners rather than being snapped together or glued as with toy radios. These fasteners cause us to fantasize about modifications such as a better antenna. Yet again, another story.
Ease of Use
Some of the blister pack FRS/GMRS radios are so loaded with features they become difficult to use unless you’re on them every day. BCA’s approach to this is perfect. In my opinion the Link has enough features for effective use, but by lacking dodads such as scan and VOX it’s much less confusing when you step through the menus. Such features can be useful, especially scan, but simplicity is key if we want radio use to become more common in our sport. Which leads to our next thought.
Safety
Inter-group communication is just as important to avalanche safety as is your beacon or airbag. The 2-way radio enhances such communication to a stunning degree. More, beyond avalanche safety you’ll still find that using walkie talkies can make a huge difference in situation such as navigating complex terrain. Yes, there is indeed a geek factor to these things. Get over it. Hide the Link base-unit in your backpack, discreetly mount the handmic on your pack strap, turn off all the beeps, don’t chatter, and you’ll be able to live with it.
Ergonomics
Base unit is basic. Smaller would be nicer, but whatever. A small lanyard mount on the top enables hanging from the inside of your pack in the recommended vertical position. You could also do this with the included belt-clip if you could find (or mod) a way to attach it. In either case, our testing indicates that to keep the unit vertical you need more than just a basic attachment inside your backpack. I rigged up some bungie cords that stabilize the position of the radio in one of my packs. BCA backpacks will of course have a dedicated Link mounting system.
Handmic (BCA offical name “Smart Mic”) is designed to locate on your pack strap with the coil-cord feeding up over your shoulder, operated with either hand. I find the PTT (push-to-talk) is a bit awkward to press, but I’m getting used to it. Looking down at the Smart Mic, you can see the volume/power dial as well as the pre-set channel selector dial with its A through F markings. The movement of both dials is adequately attenuated to prevent accidental changes. Nonetheless, per good radio technique glance down when transmitting to make sure you’re on the correct pre-set, and check your volume once in a while by calling for a radio check. (Some 2-way radios have a volume self check. Link doesn’t have this as an obvious option. Still, you can do a volume self-check by turning on any of your weather channels, which will result in either static noise or voice you can check. I’d recommend programming your local weather broadcast to one of the pre-sets, perhaps the last one, F.)
The base unit has no charging indicator in the LCD. Instead, the light on the wall wart goes red when charging and green when done. To me this situation is a big detriment, as I can see myself charging the Link in a variety of situations when the wall wart is not used. Indeed, if BCA is keeping a list of recommended improvements, let me recommend “charging indicator in LCD.”
One other ergonomics take: We really like the LED flashlights built into some FRS/GMRS radios. Carrying two light sources during big backcountry trips is an important safety consideration (main headlamp and some sort of tiny auxiliary light). Link LCD can be used as a light source by pressing the MENU button. It’s dim and turns off after 3 seconds, but would be adequate to illuminate swapping batteries in a headlamp, or finding a lost hat in your sleeping bag at 2:00 in the morning.
Weight
Big consideration, especially for those of you who presently don’t carry 2-way radios. The better blister pack FRS/GMRS radios we use weigh around 7.3 ounces, 207 grams with lithium AA batteries installed and a set of spares. (They’re easily waterproofed by carrying in a ziplock, though doing so is a bother. Waterproof blister pack radios are available, and weigh a bit more. ). Link total on our scale (handmic and base) weighs 11.4 ounces, 322 grams. Add a handmic to your blister pack radio and you up the total by at least 3 ounces, to at least 10 ounces, 284 grams. That’s still lighter than BC Link, but not by much. What that extra ounce or so gets you is the key: Link is waterproof, apparently durable, and has what I’m assuming is significantly longer life battery than what we get with the 3 AA cells (and a set of spares) for our blister pack unit.
Real World Test
I took a Link out skiing today, paired with Lisa carrying a regular name-brand FRS/GMRS. We tested while separated by a small hill. Transmissions were clear as ever. We then tested by talking from top of ski resort to the base area, about 2,000 vertical feet and not line-of-site. A bit of static, but totally audible. I’m not sure Link is any better than another good quality FRS/GMRS, but it’s certainly no worse. Tomorrow I’ll do a brutal comparo by having a person drive away in a car while continuing to talk, using the Link as well as another radio. I doubt we’ll find anything significant.
Conclusion
If you’re a big radio user I’d think the small weight penalty would be worth going with BC Link. If you’re the type of user who keeps the radio stashed in your backpack, turned off, a smaller/lighter rig might be more appropriate (some blister pack FRS/GMRS radios are quite small). Me, I’ll probably use both types depending on situation. Have to say I really like the Link handmic with controls, and not worrying about moisture is a big plus. Four WildSnow.com ski tips up to BCA Link!
Size of Link, from BCA:
Mic: 3.3” x 1.0” x 1.8” / 8.0 x 4.0 x 4.5 cm
Base unit: 2.5” x 2.0” x 6.0” / 6 x 5 x 15 cm

Have you seen the new Icom ID-5100

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With a lot information around the web about 2 way radio newcastle’s it can be hard to discover the best and largely direct articles. heres a piece from a good blog that i believe to be veritable, do not quote me on it but please read and enjoy

Today the Martin Lynch and Sons sales team were treated with a visit from Icoms John Turner, who came bearing Icoms soon to be released ID-5100.

Offering dual band 50w vhf/uhf operation on independent band units via a large touch sensitive screen, D-star as standard to enable world-wide communications for when the local analogue repeater is quiet. A simple User Interface for safe mobile operation alongside Bluetooth integration with Icoms very own android app. The ultimate modern vhf/uhf mobile transceiver!

Having spent a few hours with this latest offering from Icom, its great to see the amateur Walkie Talkie market stepping into the future and integrating with communication devices from everyday life.

Motorola Posts Disappointing Q1 On Government Slowdown, Narrowbanding Impact

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communication device mobileSo to carry on my run of content pieces on this website, I have decided to share one of our favorite content pieces this week. I used to be cautious to include it to the website because I really didn’t wish to offend the original author, but I trust he/she is glad that I enjoyed reading their work and wanted to share it with my readers.

Motorola Solutions(NYSE:MSI) recently announced a weak set of Q1 2014 results, as government revenues fell 11% and operating profits by 21% over the same period last year due to a higher-than-expected overhanging impact of narrowbanding in North America. A sustained decline in the federal business also had an impact on government revenues, and the company expects only a modest improvement this year from the government shutdown-related lows of last year. The companys enterprise revenues, excluding iDEN, declined just 1% over the same period last year recovering gradually from recent macroeconomic uncertainties and offsetting some of the impact of the under-performing government division. Motorola expects the demand environment, especially in the government business, to remain challenging in the near term, with government sales expected to decline by 8-11% in the second quarter.
In order to focus singularly on its government business, which accounts for almost 70% of its total revenues, Motorola has decided to sell off its enterprise division to Zebra Technologies for $3.45 billion in cash. The company expects the deal to close by the end of the year, following which the excess capital will be returned to shareholders in a timely manner. The enterprise sale provides Motorola with an opportunity to restructure and reduce costs in keeping with the current business environment. Motorola expects to cut around $200 million in operating costs over the next 18-24 months. We have a slightly revised$65 price estimate for Motorola, whichis about in line with the current market price.
Narrowbanding And Federal Impact
One of the biggest reasons that Motorola mentioned for its top-line under-performance last quarter was its lower-aged government backlog in North America. The company acknowledged that it underestimated the impact of narrowbanding in previous years, which had led to record years in 2012 and 2011.Motorolas government revenues in those years were boosted by thenarrowbanding mandate issued by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), which necessitated a switch to a more efficient spectrum band for public safety operations. With most of the narrowbanding-related equipment upgrades now complete and government agencies going slow on their capital spending, Motorolas government businessfaces near-term growth concerns.
The tough year-over-year comparison was accentuated by a challenging federal environment in the aftermath of the recent government shutdown in September. In the fourth quarter, Motorola had suffered a revenue hit of about $150 million in its federal business. Since most of this shortfall wasnt deferred, Motorola was unable to recoup the losses in Q1. The federal slump should continue in the near term, with government sales expectedto decline by about 9.5% at the mid-point of guidance. However, for the full-year, the company expects a solid back-half recovery to help stem the slide to the low-to-mid single digits. The downside is limited by the fact that public safety is usually down the priority list of areas in which governments will look to cut their spending. As a result, we see any further impact to government revenues from sequestration, or the spending cuts that the federal government started implementing, being fairly muted.
LTE Transition And Margins Key To Long-term Fundamentals
Going forward, we see the adoption of LTE for public-safety use, along with the broader trend of analog-to-digital shift in the U.S. and internationally, as the key drivers of Motorolas value. U.S. public safety spending in the coming years will be bolstered by the job creation bill passed in 2012 that reallocated the D Block spectrum for public safety use and provided a funding of $7 billion to build out a nationwide network over eight years. We expect Motorola to benefit from the stickiness of its government customers as well as its strong market position and large installed base of security devices to grab a big chunk of that market going forward.The companys recent launch ofAPX 7000L, its first radio – http://www.easytechsrl.net/?p=51 – that works both on legacy LMR (Land Mobile Radio) and next-generation 4G LTE networks, bolsters our view that Motorola has positioned itself strongly to benefit from the LTE transition in the years to come (seeMotorola Solutions Sharpens LTE Focus With First 4G-Capable Radio For Public Safety).
It is also a good sign for the future that the company has been successful in driving efficiency through its operations over the last couple of years, and expects to accelerate those efforts in the coming quarters. Despite the top-line concerns and significant operating leverage in the business, Motorola expects operating margins to improve by almost a percentage point to 18.5% in 2014, benefiting mostly from the the cost controls in place as well as the $200 million in cost cuts expectedover the next two years. Going forward, we expect the operational efficiencies to more than offset the gross-margin decline that could result from rising competition in the coming years as rivals increasingly address the ongoing transition of public safety networks from analog to digital.

Best Satellite Radio Receivers

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The basis of this post is to make you consider what in life is significant and what does getting the up-to-date communication devices and their functions really mean to us

2 way radio johannesburgSatellite RadioSatellite radios are quite popular and are becoming more affordable each year. Basically, the digital radio is broadcast by a communications satellite that covers a wide range of radio signals, so that you can get any basic music genre, talk radio, comedy stand ups, news, weather, sports, etc without commercials.
Satellite radios allow you to listen to the same radio no matter where you’re going. You could travel across the country, and still listen to the same station that you initially started with when you left.
You can purchase your subscription with Sirius, XM, or Worldspace, and be able to listen to anything that you want anywhere that you’re at.

When compared to regular AM/FM radios and digital television radios, satellite radios really do come on top. Even with the small monthly fee, that typically starts at about $12.50, you’ll receive better signal, a wide variety of stations, and in most cases few to no interruptions between songs. What’s cool is that these Radio (edublogs.org)s are portable, and of course minimal interruptions by commercials; a DJ may interrupt in between songs, but you won’t really come across many commercials since it’s a paid subscription. They just don’t need advertisers.
More recently, you’ll find that newer car models are coming equipped with satellite receivers, so all you need to do is purchase the subscription. Many of the newer cars by all of the major car manufacturers offer either XM or Sirius receivers. You’ll find that Volkswagen and Audi have an exclusive contract with Sirius until 2012; GM, Honda, and Suzuki are investors in XM. You’ll find that Bentley and Rolls-Royce vehicles are not only equipped with the satellite radio receiver but a lifetime subscription for Sirius. And, any Harley-Davidson motorcycle models will be equipped with XM satellite radio.

You will find that most vehicles that have satellite radio receivers pre-installed, will also be a little more expensive, so if you don’t want to pay that price (many don’t), they when you are ready for a satellite radio, you will want to check out the best satellite radio receivers so that you can get the best one for your dollar.
See all 4 photos Delphi SA10315-11B1 XpressRC Plug and Play XM Satellite Radio with Color DisplayAmazon Price: $149.99
List Price: $169.99Audiovox XMCK30PXM Xpress-RC ReceiverAmazon Price: $99.00
List Price: $169.99Delphi XpressRCThe XpressRC satellite radio features a full color, split screen display that you can adjust the brightness of in order to get the best clarity for your preferences. There’s an easy to use 5-way navigational control for rapid channel scrolling, as well. The Delphi satellite radio can be used in the car, at home, and with your audio system as long as you have the compatible accessories. You can set your top 10 favorite channels, but not only that you can enjoy the stock ticker and sports scores.

This device allows you to save your 10 favorite songs, and scan/locate FM frequencies using XM through your FM radio. The Delphi XpressRC has 60 minute pause and replay; tune select to find your favorite artists or songs *tracking up to 20); and GameSelect to find your favorite sports event or team and alert you when they’re playing (selecting up to 50 teams).

When you purchase the XpressRC Delphi satellite radio, you will receive a remote control, cassette adapter, car cradle, swivel mount, vent mount, car power adapter, XM car antenna, Swivel mount preparation kit.
There are two different models of the XpressRC- the SA10315-11B1 and the XMCK30PXM- both are pretty similar, so it will be your decision a to which one you’d prefer. Just keep in mind that both are plug in and play, meaning they’re not a wireless transmitters. And, for those of you with big fingers, you may have trouble pushing the power button, as it’s a little small, but those minor details are nothing when compared to the features and usability of the device.

See all 4 photos Pioneer GEX-INNO2BK Inno 2 Portable XM Satellite Radio with MP3 CapabilityAmazon Price: $299.00
List Price: $335.99Pioneer GEX-INNO2BKThe Pioneer satellite radio is small in size but it has big features. The INNO2BK is one of the first satellite radios that can play MP3s and WMAs, as well as search over 170 channels of live XM radio. It’s also one of the first portable satellite radios, that was released on the market, so you can get your XM radio in the car and on the go.
You can record your favorite XM channels at home or in your car without using a computer. All you have to do is click it and save it so you can listen to it again and share it with a friend.

You can manage your MP3s, WMAs, and XM tracks using the XM/Napster program that you’ll need to download to your computer. You can create and manage your own playlists with MP3s/WMAs that you ripped from your favorite CDs and the XM tracks that yo purchased from Napster. You don’t even need the internet or a computer to do it, as long as you have it on your radio.

The Pioneer INNO2BK can be docked and set up for use at home or you can clip it to your belt and keep it at your side where ever you go.

When you purchase the INNO2BK Pioneer satellite radio, you receive a home dock, home antenna, AC power adapter, travel adapter, RCA cable, USB cable, belt clip, ear buds, and a battery.
See all 4 photos SIRIUS ST4-TK1 Starmate 4 Plug-and-Play Satellite Radio Receiver with Car KitAmazon Price: $99.00
List Price: $149.99SIRIUS Starmate 4If you’re looking for a relatively inexpensive satellite radio, the Starmat 4 is the one that you’ll want to look at first. It has a basic design that is pretty simple to use. Some find that there are a few flaws in the design such as the lack of an auxiliary input and antenna, power and auxiliary output from the car dock are on the back of the device versus the bottom or side. The overall device is pretty slim, which definitely increases your portability.
The Starmate 4 does have a pause and rewind feature with a 4 4minute playback function. It features a 5 line LCD wide screen, which is definitely a nice feature to have because you won’t have to squint to read the screen.
The Sirius Starmate 4 has a 30 channel preset, 30 song memory, and game alerts.

Some customers have also complained about the wireless connection being poor, but for the money, the overall usability of the device, and the lifespan, the Sirius Starmate 4 is still considered one of the better options to choose from.

See all 4 photos SIRIUS Stiletto 2 Portable Satellite Radio with MP3 PlayerAmazon Price: $799.99
List Price: $399.99Sirius SLH2 Home Install Kit for the Stiletto 2 Portable RadioAmazon Price: $34.95
List Price: $49.99Directed Electronics Sirius SLV2 Vehicle Install Kit for the Stiletto 2 Portable RadioAmazon Price: $179.99
List Price: $49.99Sirius Stiletto 2The Sirius Stiletto 2 is a portable satellite radio that you can use at home, in the car, or on the go. It has a slim and sleek design that is a little smaller than the video iPod, making it pretty easy to take with you, definitely increasing the portability option.
The Stiletto 2 features a built-in antenna that lets you get a signal without needing an external car or home docking station. This satellite radio can handle MP3 and WMA files, so you can mix your live radio with your personal collection. The Sirius Stiletto has up to 100 hours of internal storage of live satellite programs, and when using a car or home docking station, you can broadcast both Sirius radio and digital audio files over any FM stereo.

You can bookmark your favorite songs and tag them so that you can go back later and purchase them using any Windows-based online music service.
Another cool option is that you can use a removable microSD memory card so that you can expand your music collection by adding more memory to the device. You can manage your songs using the My Sirius Studio software that is included.

The Stiletto 2 even has WiFi capability that permits access to Sirius Internet Radio (additional subscription fee). The Sirius Internet Radio gives subscribers access to more than 80 additional channels of Sirius Satellite Radio to include 2 of Howard Stern’s channels, Martha Stewart Living Radio, Sirius OutQ, and more commercial free radio stations.

The 2.2 inch color display is easy to read, and the media dial with 6-way navigation lets you easily scroll through your music playlists. You can get game alerts, as well as the ability to pause, rewind, and replay up to 60 minutes of live radio. Parents can even set up parental controls for their kids.

When you purchase the Stiletto 2 Sirius radio, you will receive a battery, AC power adapter, Altec Lansing headphones, ear buds, PC cable, and the My Sirius Studio software. Just remember that the home and car kit is not included with the purchase of the receiver; you will need to purchase them separately.

Delphi Roady XT For XM Car & Home Satellite Radio Receiver Current Bid: $9.99

Walkie Talkie – An Essential Mode of Communication

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So ladies and gentlemen, i’ve another exceptional communication device for als piece to read, i know, you do not need to thank me all, just click a social like to the article to illustrate your appreciation.

As we all know communication is the solution for every problem, we must know about one of the easiest and reliable source known as 2 Way Radio. As the name suggests, in two way radios, the communication happens two ways. In this type of radio, we can send and receive messages both alternatively. This sending and receiving can only happen when both the sender and receiver are operational under same channel frequency.

There are many types of two way radios which exist in this world. These can be of the following types:
Trunked
Half duplex
Conventional
Duplex
Mobile phones are also one type of two Way Radio systems, the only difference being both sending and receiving can happen simultaneously. To work, a mobile phone requires a base transceiver system to receive the signal and relocate the signal to different users. These walike talkies are used by many militants, entrepreneurs, and civilians who all reside in the rural areas where network is a major issue.

With the world moving towards digitization, let’s talk about digital two way radios. Digital Walkie Talkies use binary system to send and receive messages. They are the upgraded technology which provides superior voice clarity and simultaneous sending receiving option.
Though in comparison to the previous analogue radios, they are complex in functionality. They can be used with many newly available applications (software related) and can also reduce the usage of bandwidth. Individuals have to be cautious while using the ignitable and sodden locations.

These can cause modulations in the voice quality and can even hinder the communication in far off places. These issues pertaining to poor network in far off places can be resolved using PMR radio (Professional mobile radios). PMRs basically transfer small data and voice related messages in rural areas where the network is the concerned issue.
It is used for both personal and commercial use within a limited short range of distance. Depending upon the requirement, you can choose from the available range of PMR radio and DMR radio. Like for commercial, large distance, and data safety purpose, one should go for Trunking systems with repeaters.

Whereas license free radio is used for short distances and compared to others these are economical in price. Licence free radio is yet another very interesting type of radio, which has potentially replaced the large sized safety radios. They are very small in size and are equipped with small and powerful antennas.
These antennas can help in transmitting the high quality voice messages across to another user within a limited space.

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