Motorola defends contracting practices

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communication between devices wifiYou can be safe in the wisdom that I bring the best two way radio online articles, some of them are my own a number of which are curated by me, if i decide to use someone elses content its because its appropriate to my readership, so feel confident you are reading the best from my industry.

Morola Solutions is rejecting as innuendo a series of articles in which McClatchy examined the companys decades-long dominance of the emergency communications market.

The stories described multiple ways that city, county and state officials have favored Motorola with noncompetitive contracts, including from at least nine of the nations 20 largest cities. The firm has reaped billions of dollars in annual revenue amid a nationwide push to avoid a repeat of the radio failures of 9-11.

In a statement, the company called it very disturbing that a news organization would cast suspicion of any Motorola contract with a government entity that did not fit a generic, competitive-bid model, and at the same time cast aspersions on the integrity of the government entities with which we do business.

Motorola issued the statement and sent a letter to The Sacramento Bee, a McClatchy newspaper, which published an editorial Sunday challenging policymakers to ask hard questions about how the company has preserved an estimated 80 percent share of the public safety Walkie Talkie market.

Motorola said various legally available contract vehicles that forgo competitive bids enable governments to procure in a manner that can achieve cost savings for taxpayers, and enable faster implementation, which can be an important consideration for equipment that can serve as a lifeline for first responders.

The company did not address concerns about its radio prices up to $7,500 apiece.

McClatchy also reported that foundations for Motorola and its former parent donated more than $25 million over six years to nonprofits with police- and firefighter-related missions, aiding a constituency that has backed its products.

The company called it very disturbing that a news organization would question a law-abiding companys community citizenship.

Motorolas employees and shareholders are deeply proud of the investments our Foundation makes to better the communities where we operate, it said, adding that the donations further the invaluable partnership we have with the public safety community.

In addition, the company defended former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, who responded to radio outages from Hurricane Katrina by spearheading a push for a new statewide radio system and a separate high-speed broadband data-delivery network for first responders.

Motorola won both contracts, which could generate $300 million. Months after leaving office, Barbour registered as a Motorola lobbyist, McClatchy reported.

Barbour, a Republican, showed tremendous leadership throughout the rebuilding of the devastated areas of Mississippi, the company said.

Leaders like Governor Barbour personally understand how the public safety community relies on survivable, interoperable communications during disasters and crises, the company said. That kind of leadership and experience is invaluable to us and the first responders Motorola Solutions serves every day across the country. We are proud to have Governor Barbour on our team.

Read more here: http://www.star-telegram.com/2014/04/09/5723842/motorola-defends-contracting-practices.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy

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What is sk radio

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What will you do if i stated I have found a 2 way radio antenna short article that is not only fascinating but informative as well? I knew you would not believe me, so here it is the educational, superb and fascinating piece

2 way radios or transceivers are products that may send and receive data simultaneously. These walkie talkies happen to be being used since a very very long time. These were used extensively in world war ii for the objective of communication. To this day these radios are utilized in various fields. Additionally they are supplied with several features which make them simple and easy , simple to use nowadays. Instead of the earlier occasions, these radios today are compact, lightweight and could be easily transported in one spot to another.

These radios work on a technology known as frequency modulation. By 50 Percent way radios information is transported over waves of various wavelengths. The regularity from the wave also determines the length the data will visit. The bigger the frequency, the greater the length travelled through the message sent and vice versa. Most radios of the type also provide an antenna mounted on them so they can be used as simpler and faster transmission of information.

A top quality antenna guarantees the message is distributed and received very clearly and with no interference.These radios should be bought after thinking about various factors. These 4 elements include cost, the number from the radios, the design and style, using a person as well as the kind of battery utilized in these radios. When the 2 way radio continues to be bought, they have to be taken proper proper care of to ensure that their efficiency and effectiveness improve.

Among the primary things that should be stored in your mind is the fact that these Walkie Talkies should be stored inside a dry place and never in moisture. It has to be also made certain these radios aren’t dropped as this cuts down on the existence from the radios. Also these radios mustn’t be uncovered to extreme temperature conditions. This really is to make sure that the battery along with other electronic parts aren’t affected negatively through the temperature conditions. These radios will not be washed with chemicals because they might damage the various from the radio.

Additionally the batteries of those radios should be regularly checked to make sure that there’s no leakage. Any leakage within the battery cuts down on the existence from the battery along with the radio.These radios may even work on high wavelengths including ultra high wavelengths. These wavelengths are usually employed for communication over very lengthy distances.

The two way radios that work on high wavelengths are employed for communication reasons in remote areas. Also many of these radios use type of sight propagation. Which means that the two way radios cannot operate well if there’s some obstruction or maybe the terrain from the land isn’t plain. These radios also fail to work well in hilly areas.

The Universal Translator

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2 way radio icomSo to carry on my run of posts on this blog, I have planned to share one of my favorite posts this week. I was hesitant to add it to this website as I actually didn’t want to offend the initial author, but I trust he/she is glad that I enjoyed reading their article and wanted to share it with my readers.

Originally conceived by science fiction writer Murray Leinster and utilized in his 1945 novella First Contact, the universal translator is a device that translates any language into a language known to the devices user.

Most people reading this article will be infinitely more familiar with the universal translator as featured in Star Trek and its various incarnations. Star Treks version of the translator is actually an extremely effective plot device, allowing aliens from anywhere in the universe to speak perfect English, even if they have never met a Human being a day in their lives (and thus allowing the writers of Star Trek the freedom to not have to explain why each alien race speaks English so well in every other episode). In reality, alien linguistics would likely be so alien that they could take generations to decipher and even prove to be impossible for Human vocal chords to mimic.

On a more down to earth level, a universal translator would decode any/all languages spoken on earth instantly (or near-instantly), allowing a person speaking Mandarin Chinese to freely converse with a person speaking Hindi with no miscommunications whatsoever.

Why we want it:

Such technology could really benefit the Human race in its quest for world peace.

In much the same way that the Internet has made it harder for various politically motivated factions to create propaganda about those they wish to invade (because now we can simply ask them if the stories are true or not), a universal translator would help people to reach a shared understanding.

Nothing would ever be lost in translation and everything would be clearly and effectively understood.

The downside, of course, is that people would not have to learn another language in order to communicate with other people, this, I feel, really would be a shame, as a cultures views, experiences and legacy are often enshrined in its language, meaning that learning another language really is a window into a larger world with many different points of view.

When can we expect it?

You can see a crap version of this technology if you use Google Translate, but thats only useful if youre decoding simple phrases and words.

Early versions of the universal translator as seen in Star Trek (and other series), do actually exist. American troops in Iraq employed the TRANSTAC program, (which automatically translated Arabic-English), before replacing it with the BOLT program (Broad Operational Language Translation), which serves as the current version of the US army translator.

However, the translator that allows us to freely chat in two distinct languages (and still be understood) has yet to be invented. In my estimation, the technology could one day exist and well probably see its true prototype within the next 50 years, as such an invention will likely become a necessity of business by the mid 21st Century.

If I had to pick someone who was likely to invent it, Id go with Google. It is in their best interests to come up with it first.

Do not forget that scene in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home where the crew of the Enterprise fly back in time to the mid 1980s and Doc McCoy encounters an elderly Woman who wants kidney dialysis. Exploding in skepticism, the good doctor cries what is this, the dark ages!? before giving the Woman a tablet that rapidly grows her a brand new kidney, much to her delight. That is where we might be within a couple of decades – Star Trek technology. What is cooler than that?

Joining the NHS organ donor list is a way you can help this case, today.

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The wireless connections that may transform our lives

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My basic review of a new article it starts up well, looks quite awesome, is easy to run and actually power efficient, the communication device class (cdc) specification is a fine item. Im pleased I purchased it, read further below.

“Start Quote But the Internet of Everything is so large a concept that the vision rapidly becomes first daunting and then a bit paralysing, even to the experts. ”
End Quote Peter Day But that was long before the concept of Silicon Fen emerged from the concentration of clever people who clustered inside Cambridge University’s laboratories.

In 1990, the silicon chip design business ARM was spun out of Acorn, the Cambridge company that had made the pioneering BBC micro-computer. That was in the days when computer-makers often did their own chip designs rather than buy them in from the great big manufacturers.

ARM specialised in chips that used much less power than their rivals. It still does, very successfully. These chips have become increasingly important with the rise of mobile phones and mobile computing, ushering in a wireless world of a scale and scope undreamed of by the pioneers at Pye.

And wireless became a Cambridge speciality. Cambridge Silicon Radio (now CSR) was a company founded in 1999 to create chips for Bluetooth short range wireless communication.

Many of the newer wireless businesses are not well-known. They may have a global reach, but they are consultants or firms without consumer brand names. But that does not mean they are not making money or employing well paid specialists.
Talking domestic appliances This emergence of a wireless cluster around Cambridge is a significant addition to the British business landscape, and from it has emerged this Future of Wireless conference.

This year the subject has been the Internet of Things, or the “Internet of Everything, or Everywhere”.
Intelligent fridges have long been talked about Just imagine, say the visionaries, what will happen when we start to add sensors and data streaming devices to objects, and things start interconnecting just as people do now.
You’ll be able to monitor the security of your house from across the world, via the internet, and turn on the central heating when you’re coming home.

Doctors will be able to get live feeds of vital signs from their patients – blood pressure, sugar level, heartbeat. Sensors in stomachs will tell farmers when their cattle need medicine or extra feed.
And fridges will notify owners when they are running low on ingredients for the evening meal.
“Start Quote So many uncertainties and potential difficulties surround the idea of the Internet of Things that it is easy to scoff at the hugeness of the concept.”

End Quote Peter Day A lot of this is fairly familiar. I’ve been hearing about the intelligent fridge for almost 20 years.
Lots of appliances are now so computerised that they ought to be able to benefit from internet connectivity, so that (for example) a connected washing machine could find out how to wash a fabric not invented when the machine was made.
The experts at this conference have been driven by that vision of 50 billion connected things. And at first sight it is both dramatic and exciting for the wireless specialists.

A whole world of possibilities we can barely think about enabled by connectivity that will require some big advances in technology – bandwidth provision, low power transmission, really low-cost devices much cheaper than mobile phones.
‘Killer application’ But the Internet of Everything is so large a concept that the vision rapidly becomes first daunting and then a bit paralysing, even to the experts. Who will organise the protocols that enable machines to speak to machines? What regulation will be needed?

What about security – who might be hacking in to my central heating system?
Who will do the connecting? Existing mobile networks or new ones? Who will pay what for this extension of the convenience world?
The technology could mean farmers get sent data about their animals’ heath Where is the killer application that will suddenly have consumers clamouring for interconnected devices in the way that the internet itself took off in the 1990s after Sir Tim Berners-Lee at Cern invented the www address system, the worldwide web?

Will the current internet giants evolve into Internet of Things corporations, or will the winners be new, nimble and unheard of?
So many uncertainties and potential difficulties surround the idea of the Internet of Things that it is easy to scoff at the hugeness of the concept.
And yet, of course, it is already happening, bit by bit, sector by sector – at different speeds according to what area of industry or human activity is involved.

Cars are already hugely computerised; the European Union is mandating that all new cars in Europe will have to be fitted with what is called the eCall system, which will automatically connect a vehicle to emergency services following a collision and provide location and impact information.
(It has to be said that this was first planned in 2005 with a 2009 deadline for implementation, so there is a lot of room for drift.)

Telemedicine using sensors is being tested in various parts of the world, and may be invaluable in an ageing world. Cameras are already wirelessing their pictures to the internet.
The stands at the Cambridge conference include start-up companies involved with those farm sensors for animals to swallow and send their health data direct to farmers’ computers by wireless.
Another business is seeking to seed farmland with hundreds of cheap devices which will 2 Way Radio aridity information direct to a control room so that farmers can direct irrigation directly to the parts of fields where it is needed.

There is plenty of room for bold new disruptive entrepreneurs.
My conclusion to two days’ exposure to the exhilarating possibilities of the Internet of Things is that it’s too huge to grasp and too easy to get carried away into a sci-fi rhapsody.
But think about it sector by sector, industry by industry, place by place, and something begins to emerge out of the mist. It is happening all round us. But it will probably not be called the Internet of Things.

Article written by Peter Day Peter Day Global business correspondent
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